Persian Courses

Persian Language Courses

First year, first semester Persian language. Conversation, reading, and composition in modern Persian.
First year, second semester Persian language. Conversation, reading, and composition in modern Persian.
Conversation in the dialect of contemporary Iran; extensive readings in classical and modern literature.
Conversation in the dialect of contemporary Iran; extensive readings in classical and modern literature.
Readings in Persian, with the objective of preparing the student for independent research.
Readings in Persian, with the objective of preparing the student for independent research.
This course offers advanced students the opportunity to study authentic professional, academic, technical, and creative texts. It will help them develop superior level proficiency by improving their vocabulary, reading ability, writing skills, and knowledge of the nuances of the language. Reading skills will be acquired through the use of authentic texts and media. Listening skills will be acquired through discussions and exposure to news broadcasts, interviews, songs, and audio-visual materials. Writing skills will be improved through writing assignments followed by feedback from the instructor and fellow students. Superior speaking skills will be practiced in class discussions, group activities, presentations, and through the simulation of cultural and linguistic contexts.
This course is the continuation of PRS 407/507, and it offers advanced students a chance to delve into the study of authentic professional, academic, technical, and creative texts. It will help them develop superior level proficiency by improving their vocabulary, reading ability, writing skills, and their knowledge of the nuances of the language. Reading skills will be acquired through the use of authentic texts and media. Listening skills will be acquired through discussions and exposure to news broadcasts, interviews, songs, and audio-visual materials. Writing skills will be improved through writing assignments followed by feedback from the instructor and fellow students. And superior speaking skills will be practiced in class discussions, group activities, presentations, and through the simulation of cultural and linguistic contexts.
Third year, first semester Persian language. Readings in Persian, with the objective of preparing the student for independent research. Graduate-level requirements include additional readings and translations.
Third year, second semester Persian language. Readings in Persian, with the objective of preparing the student for independent research. Graduate-level requirements include additional readings and translations.
This course offers advanced students the opportunity to study authentic professional, academic, technical, and creative texts. It will help them develop superior level proficiency by improving their vocabulary, reading ability, writing skills, and knowledge of the nuances of the language. Reading skills will be acquired through the use of authentic texts and media. Listening skills will be acquired through discussions and exposure to news broadcasts, interviews, songs, and audio-visual materials. Writing skills will be improved though writing assignments followed by feedback from the instructor and fellow students. Superior speaking skills will be practiced in class discussions, group activities, presentations, and through the simulation of cultural and linguistic contexts. Graduate-level requirements includes translation and incorporation of primary sources use in the course in research projects (25%).
This course is the continuation of PRS 507, and it offers advanced students a chance to delve into the study of authentic professional, academic, technical, and creative texts. It will help them develop superior level proficiency by improving their vocabulary, reading ability, writing skills, and their knowledge of the nuances of the language. Reading skills will be acquired through the use of authentic texts and media. Listening skills will be acquired through discussions and exposure to news broadcasts, interviews, songs, and audio-visual materials. Writing skills will be improved though writing assignments followed by feedback from the instructor and fellow students. And superior speaking skills will be practiced in class discussions, group activities, presentations, and through the simulation of cultural and linguistic contexts. Graduate-level requirements includes translation and incorporation of primary sources use in the course in research projects (25%).

Persian Content Courses

Middle East history from the rise of Islam to the Turkish conquest of Constantinople, 600 – 1453.
This course examines the grammatical structure, linguistic usage, and sociolinguistic status of a particular language from the Near East. The language covered changes each year but may include varieties of Arabic, Hebrew, Turkish, Persian, and other languages of the region.
This course introduces Middle Eastern women's issues through a critical reading of literary works written by women in the major languages of the Near East (Arabic, Hebrew, Persian, and Turkish) that are available in translation. Readings include poetry, short stories, and novels all analyzed within their social context.
Iran has been lauded as one of the great exporters of cinema during the last two decades. During this time, Iranian films have won countless international awards and enjoyed great reviews. Through the analysis of movies, the history of Iranian cinema, cinematic criticism, and historical texts, this course helps students understand the process of social change in that society and the ways such changes influence the production of art. Students watch a variety of movies and read analytical and theoretical writings on cinema all placed in their social and historical contexts. Particular attention will be paid to issues such as gender, modernization, nationalism, class struggle, and ideological enunciations. The course will try to conceptualize past cinematic movements in order to understand how Iranian cinema has gained its current status. Assignments include weekly reports on the movies and readings, class participation, and a term paper.
This course provides students with a critical understanding of the histories and cultures of the Persian-speaking world, which includes the communities in Persian, Iran, Afghanistan, Tajikistan, Uzbekistan, China, Pakistan, India, Turkey, Iraq, United States, Israel, United Arab Emirates, Canada, and European countries. This course introduces students to the Persian civilization from a variety of approaches. This course will help students to engage with major historical and cultural developments in Persian history and civilization. In light of the disciplinary methodologies related to those fields, students will study the texts and material culture of Iran in order to understand historical, literary, and political developments within their social contexts. Eventually, students will gain an understanding of how Persia developed into a world power, how it was divided, and how it continued to exist as a cultural concept. Students will read texts in English, watch films, and experience music, dance, and food. Through a comparative and critical approach, the course will also examine the value and limitations of theoretical perspectives offered by related disciplines such as literary, political science, religion, and cultural studies.
This course takes the life, teachings, and poetry of Rumi, a central figure in the Persian Sufi tradition, as a starting point for a broader investigation into medieval Islamic spirituality, society, and literature. We also consider Rumi's legacy in the modern period, including the many translations of his works and his reception by practitioners of New Age spirituality. Assessments include a final culminating project and short weekly presentations.
This course considers Iranian society and culture from the point of view of the social sciences, supplemented by insights provided through fiction and film. Course content focuses on twentieth-century and contemporary Iran. Topics will include tribal society, rural society, urban life, and their interactions; social structure; Iranian identity; gender; minority groups, language; religious beliefs and rituals; and political movements. The class will pay particular attention to how Iranian society and culture have been studied, by whom, and how these have changed over time. The course will emphasize the subject of diversity in Iran, and have a particular focus on the large body of social science research conducted in and around Fars province and the city of Shiraz.
Topics vary, including Classical Persian Literature in English Translation; Classical Persian Literature in the Original Language; Medieval Cultural and Political History of Persia; and Ancient Persian Language, Literature and Culture. Focus on student-faculty discussion/interaction and exchange of scholarly information, students engage in research activities and exchange results through discussion, reports, and/or papers.
Various topics including Modern Persian Literature in English Translation; Modern Persian Literature in the Original Language; Contemporary Cultural and Political History of Iran, Ideology and Revolution in Iran, and Women and Gender Issues in Contemporary Iran. Exchange of scholarly information, research by course registrants, exchange results through discussion, reports, and/or papers.